Posts Tagged ‘colour’

Dementia-friendly design

August 27, 2013

I interviewed Diana Cellela of The Drawing Room Interiors as part of a case study I created for Karndean Designflooring, showcasing the use of their stone-effect Art Select luxury vinyl flooring at the EachStep dementia care centre in Manchester.

Karndean Art Select EachStep

Diana is a specialist in dementia-friendly design, and is the chairman of the SBID Healthcare Advisory Council, which is currently launching.

She explained a few of the tips and tricks when creating an environment for this particular user group.

There are many different views on what ‘Dementia Friendly’ design is but overall any area should be as comfortable and non-institutional in appearance as possible.  A home-like or cosy look will make the residents or patients feel more at ease.

Dementia-friendly design helps to prevent accidents amongst dementia sufferers, who can have difficulty distinguishing between, or can trip and fall over, surfaces or objects with a similar light reflectance value (LRV). Flooring and furniture, for example, is recommended to be specified with at least a 30% contrast in LRV.

Conversely, they can become confused when they see two adjoining floor surfaces that have a strong contrast in LRV. Two different floor materials or finishes may appear as a step, or the dementia sufferer may perceive a hole or hollow in the floor. Flecked patterns can appear as dirt on the floor and motifs may look like actual objects, and the person may bend down to wipe the surface or pick something up.

When selecting fabric for curtains, blinds or upholstery, try to avoid large busy patterns as these have been known to cause frustration.  Also avoid flowers as some suffers may try to pick the flowers, or bold stripes as may be seen as bars at the window.

Acoustics are extremely important; background noise can lead to extreme  frustrations, so minimize noise, by using soft fabrics or acoustic panels.

Furniture should have rounded edges and is good to have fronts which allow the patient to see what the furniture is used for, for example, scooped or Perspex frontage where some of the contents are visable, this can act as a prompt to the resident.

There are so many changes, some small, that can be made to an interior that can make a massive impact on the life of a dementia sufferer, from signage, to use of reminiscence rooms, rummage boxes, artwork and colours to name just a few.

EachStep Blackley is a dementia care centre run by the not-for-profit social and health care provider CIC Group. For the reception area flooring in this project, Diana specified a stone-effect finish, which would avoid the problems described above, and also had the necessary durability to withstand the high traffic levels expected.

Dementia friendly design can be studied at the Dementia Centre at Stirling University, and  the Centre Director Professor June Andrews is also on the Society of British Interior Design’s Healthcare Advisory Council.

Diana Celella runs The Drawing Room Interiors and is Director of the SBID’s Healthcare Advisory Council.

The Psychology of Colour in hospitality spaces

May 17, 2012

Karen Haller is one of the UK’s leading authorities in applied colour psychology, specialising in business branding and business interiors.

In this Q&A, she provides an overview of her work, and some tips on how colour, and the psychological effect it has on people, can affect a business and ultimately, sales or profits.

 

Firstly, a quick introduction to the psychology of colour – to what extent does the colour of a space affect the way we feel?

Colour has an effect on our mind, body and emotions. It affects our moods and can influence our behaviours and our physical and mental well-being. This will usually be happening on an unconscious level.

Why would this be important in hospitality environments such as hotels, restaurants or bars?

One of the main factors in deciding on where to go for a meal, a drink or somewhere to stay will be on how we want to feel, for example uplifted, relaxing, peace and quiet or playful.  Colour triggers emotional responses.

The last thing a business would want to be doing unconsciously is using colour and combinations of colour that result in giving their customers an experience that ends up driving them away.

A successful business will have a clearly defined brand personality. There will be colours, and more importantly tones of colours, along with a design style, that projects the brand personality and in turn will attract the right type of clientele. They will know exactly how they will feel and the level of service they will receive. You wouldn’t expect to walk into an elegant, refined, high end establishment such as The Ritz to see it designed using hip funky colours and wacky furniture with waiters on roller skates.

London, England | Claridge's Lobby

– the refined lobby of Claridge’s

I’m sure that has a large bearing on how a customer feels (and spends!) in a hospitality industry environment?

This could make or break them. Not being clear on who they are (the brand personality), on the level of service they offer and being able to clearly and consistently show this whether it be their interiors, standard of service, their website through to their marketing literature.

Confuse the customer as to what service is on offer, or trying to be everything to everyone, and  they’ll just stay away.

Is there a typical colour scheme for a restaurant, or does it vary according to what the space is trying to achieve?

This is down to the personality of the restaurant. For example, are they aimed at children, a traditional ‘gentleman’s club’, elegant fine dining or maybe minimalist, cutting edge. Each has a clear personality aimed at a different clientele and the colours and design would reflect this.

–the blue ceiling in this American diner would not be recommended to stimulate hungry customers
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Tint | Shade | Tone | Hue | Saturation

December 21, 2009
Colour terminology

The 5 Most Commonly Misused Color Terms - The Sherwin-Williams Company

Basic colour terminology in short sentences with no swatches on the screen.

Simple.

ESI references:

Colour of the Year 2010

December 18, 2009

Pantone has declared PANTONE® 15-5519 Turquoise to be the color of the year for 2010.

PANTONE® 15-5519 Turquoise

PANTONE® 15-5519 Turquoise

‘Combining the serene qualities of blue and the invigorating aspects of green, Turquoise evokes thoughts of soothing, tropical waters and a languorous, effective escape from the everyday troubles of the world, while at the same time restoring our sense of wellbeing.’

In case you missed it, PANTONE® 14-0848 Mimosa was the lucky winer in 2009.

PANTONE® 14-0848 Mimosa

PANTONE® 14-0848 Mimosa

‘In a time of economic uncertainty and political change, optimism is paramount and no other color expresses hope and reassurance more than yellow.’

ESI references: